New at UU

October 19, 2007


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We have recently overseen installation of new, branded, external signs which we have designed for United Utilities’ headquarters in Warrington. The six sets of brushed stainless steel signs, manufactured and installed by Evolve Group of Haydock, brand and provide identification of the four Lakeland-named buildings on the established, but now rapidly expanding, Lingley Mere Business Park. The signs have been designed to integrate with the high quality architecture and landscaping of the parkland site, as well as providing a signage model for the growing number of businesses and amenities which will increase this strategic North West development to circa 120,000 sq.m.

Adrian.

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Graffiti

October 19, 2007

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If you are familiar with the streets of Shoreditch you will no doubt have seen the work Eine.

Eine is one of London’s most prolific and original street artists having started his career
over twenty five years ago as a common vandal he has toned and developed his unique
style into something which has been described as “the Fiona Rae of graffiti and spray
paint”.

Eine specialises in producing huge letters on shop fronts across London. A “Writer”
who has close associations with Banksy, it has recently been said that “Eine is doing for
letters of the alphabet what Banksy did for rats and smiley Policeman”.

Eine is a renowned London based “Writer” who specialises in the central element of all
graffiti, the letter. From single letters to complex and wry combinations, Eine’s alphabet
can be found throughout London. Huge individual letters on shop shutters, in a style he
has made his own. Originality, a distinctive style and a clear profile that sets his or her
letters apart from all others is a key goal for any “Writer”. Eine’s letters transgress the
usual stylised image devised to depict form and emotion, and through a combination of
colour, placement and size, become fully formed and unique personalities in their own
right.

Steve


BMW Welt

October 18, 2007

BMW WeltBMW unveiled the ‘BMW Welt’ a giant car delivery centre, recreation and exhibition complex, located in Munich, Germany. Customers are able to view their cars at the centre, tour the BMW factory and visit the new BMW Museum. The futuristic architecture designed by Austrian architect Wolf Prix consists of steel and glass and covers 10,000 square meters.

BMW Welt

Ben


Because forests matter

October 15, 2007

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I was interested to learn that one of our regular printers, Synergy, has recently achieved Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) accreditation. This means that their business practices, and purchase of FSC certified forest products, support and comply with the Council’s mission to “promote environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial, and economically viable management of the world’s forests” and are therefore not contributing to their worldwide destruction. Congratulations!

www.fsc.org

Adrian.


Some posters are more equal than others…

October 15, 2007

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A Soviet Poster a Day’ is a blog which celebrates the design of posters which were produced to feed the relentless propaganda needed to support the system. Whatever you think of the system, the graphic quality, range and power of these posters is amazing.


The worlds your oyster

October 12, 2007

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Tom Hine (as well as being a good friend) is a new and very talented artist who took time out to go and teach art to under-privileged children in Nepal and India, on his travels he was also invited to participate in a number of local community art projects (see photo) as well as trekking to Everest base camp. This fantastic excerpt is taken from the email describing the journey to base camp.

…it was here that we decided to head over the ‘cho la’ pass. a high icy ‘dangerous’ crossing at 5500m between gokyo and the khumbu valley. we’d talked about doing this even 6 months before going away, but on peoples recommendations at gokyo we decided to go for it. this included one girl saying that she was unable to take any photos of the pass as she was concentrating too much on staying alive!!!!! er, you what?!? other peoples words hardly calmed me, so by the morning of the climb i’d managed to paint a suitably horrific picture in my mind. a 200m vertical climb above spiky nasty bits with nothing to hold onto in a raging blizzard, that sort of thing. in reality, on first sight, not to bad i thought. 200m climb, but starting with rocky scramble at about 60 degrees rising to about a 70 degree slope covered in snow and ice. no probs. half way up i even passed a woman coming down in her old tennis trainers. whats all the fuss about like? ah, now in the snowy icy bit. this all feels a bit sketchy, not much to hold onto here, in fact how have i ended up in this position; one leg slipping on ice, the other at 45 degrees teetering on loose rock; where the hell am i supposed to put my hands?! don’t look down, s**t too late. slip here and i’m gonna pick up some nice speed on that smooth ice before launching off that rock step half way down. ah good, here’s chris; ‘need a hand mate?’ (no time for pride here) ‘ yes, desperately’.

Steve


Plan A

October 10, 2007

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Currently, there seems to be a shift in the way major companies are tackling communication between themselves and their stakeholders. This seems no more apparent than in the innovative Plan A campaign from Marks & Spencer.

There was a time when sustainability reports were the ‘be all and end all’ of communication to company stakeholders, a slick tool used to rally support of new issues on responsibility and their effects on the business. But it seems that CR reporting is coming of age. Either CR Managers are now trying to reinvent themselves, or someone has noticed that, in delivering such dry corporate communication, they miss out the most important stakeholder of them all, the customer. M&S, with their Plan A campaign, seem to have got things just right and, like many of the large companies, are now developing a campaigning approach to corporate responsibility and sustainability. Although to some it might seem like a £200 million punt to drive new business, to me it is a brilliant campaign, ‘nicely realistic’ in its approach, combining an openness to customers which sets out the company’s stall when it comes to CR issues moving forward, whilst also delivering the facts and figures needed from a stakeholder perspective in order to make solid business decisions.

I just hope, after all that hype, M&S don’t have to suddenly design a ‘Plan B’.

Steve